Food trends: Are millennials changing the way that people eat?

Consumer research on millenials shows that they tend to prefer organic, locally sourced food, and they want to know where their food comes from.

Two local professionals who work in the food service industry offered their own impressions of current consumer food trends.

When it comes to talking about food trends, Jerry Inniss, owner of 2 Doors Down, said that he hasn’t necessarily seen a trend but more of a shift.

“I think that what we’ve seen is … a little bit more shift to vegan or vegetarian stuff,” Inniss said. “I think what we’ve seen over time, I’ve been doing this a long time, what people say they are eating and what they are actually eating are different.”

He also talked about how some people will order a hamburger without a bun or how instead of eating fries, they will get a salad instead.

Ken Coder, general manager of Sodexo at LCCC, leans more on the idea that it’s not the trend, it’s more based on where the food is grown and produced.

“I believe that we have seen a move toward folks in most parts of the country really wanting to know where their food comes from,” Coder said, “Also that it is sourced sustainably and if possible, locally.”

Coder also mentioned the idea that the millennial generation has played only a small role in changing food trends and how downloadable apps, such as Venmo and Mint, have made things so much easier.  

We see lots of influences from each generation, and the millennial generation is no exception,” Coder said.

Keeping in mind the idea of eating healthy, one of the most popular diets is the Keto diet. The Keto diet, much like the Atkins diet, is considered to be a “fad” diet, or a diet that is popular for the time.

An article written by Kristin W. Barañano, and Adam L. Hartman for the journal Current Treatment Options in Neurology traces the origins of the Keto diet back to the 1920s as a way to combat epileptic seizures. Today, it is used to help gain weight-loss results faster.

“Whenever you remove carbohydrates out of your diet, you are definitely going to see results and usually quick,” Inniss said, “you put yourself into a ketosis state, you start burning fat like crazy.”  

Inniss mentioned that there are challenges when staying on these diets for long periods of time.

“What happens at the end of the day is there is a challenge with those things and if you stay on them for too long, you subject your hormones to change, your brain needs carbohydrates to operate properly,” Inniss said.

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2898565/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/9-ways-millennials-are-changing-the-way-we-eat/2018/02/20/6bb2fe60-11eb-11e8-8ea1-c1d91fcec3fe_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.70c2e3c3be0a

About Eric Ogle (4 Articles)
Eric Ogle is a sophomore at Laramie County Community College who is currently studying mass media. As a former student at the University of Wyoming, he has a degree in meteorology. His goal is to be a T.V. meteorologist. Eric likes to write about weather and does his own forecasts, uploads his own storm chasing photos and videos, as well as live streams on his personal Facebook webpage, Meteorologist Eric Ogle. Outside of being a storm chaser and meteorologist, he is a former ASUW (Associated Students of the University of Wyoming) senator at the University of Wyoming. He hopes to bring leadership to the Wingspan team. In order to contact Eric, you can either email him at ericogle@student.lccc.wy.edu, follow him on Twitter @ericogle or Eric Ogle on Facebook.

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