Hidden Delicacies: Napoli’s offers authentic Italian cuisine

 

A new locally owned Italian restaurant came to Cheyenne recently, offering a classy dining experience and authentic Italian cuisine.

 

Napoli’s opened March 29 downtown where Suite Bistro used to be. The restaurant offers a classy and authentic dining experience at competitive prices. The restaurant is owned by three first-generation immigrants from Albania: Dardan Selimi, Baton Konjfca and Shpetim Shbami.

 

Selimi said that they started out in the restaurant business in New York City after coming to the country and decided that they wanted to try and open their own restaurant. They tried in Laramie first, then moved to Cheyenne looking to offer more from their establishment.

 

Selimi said that they decided to move to Cheyenne because there wasn’t really any other Italian restaurants other than smaller restaurants and chains.

 

Selimi said that their homemade food is made by their chef from Italy.

 

“I would say our food is the most unique because there’s not too many choices besides the American grill and steakhouses in Cheyenne and also some chain restaurants,” Selimi said, “They are very good but don’t offer something more authentic as we try.”

 

Selimi recommended diners try the mozzarella caprese or fried calamari for appetizers. For entrees, the house specialties include osso bucco, any of their seafood such as the salmon dish or shrimp scampi, and  chicken parmesan.

 

“Everything is good, everything is delicious and we try to do our best,” said Salimi.

 

Salimi offered to let me try some of his recommendations free of charge to review the cuisine. I tried the the mozzarella caprese appetizer.

 

The dish consisted of alternating tomato and mozzarella slices garnished with basil and served with olive oil and balsamic vinegar. The simple combination of ingredients created subtle but good, full flavor.

 

Osso Bucco starts out as a tough veal shank that is then braised in white wine and vegetables to make the meat fall off the bone. Photo by Christopher Edwards.

The entree I enjoyed was the osso bucco. Osso bucco is tough veal shanks that are braised for a few hours in white wine and vegetables to help tenderize the meat to the point where it will fall off the bone. It’s served with carrots, celery and onions.

 

The osso bucco offered an excellent savory flavor that pairs nicely with the vegetables. The meat could be cut from the bone with just the fork and the marrow offered a much more subtle but creamy flavor.

 

For dessert, the tiramisu offered a good balance between creamy texture and sweet flavors but is purchased rather than made in the restaurant.

 

Overall, the food is excellent and has a very authentic Italian taste with prices that are very reasonable for the classy style of Napoli’s, especially when compared to the other Italian options in Cheyenne.

 

The restaurant itself has an art deco design giving it a very classic atmosphere. The restaurant is divided into two sections, the front dining area which is mixed with the bar and the back dining area. This layout provides the choice between a much more social experience up front and a calm dining experience in the back.

 

“Since the first day as first generation immigrants we came to work hard and we do our best,” Selimi said.

 

About Christopher Edwards (37 Articles)
Christopher Edwards is a sophomore at Laramie County Community College majoring in Multimedia. Edwards is also an editor for Wingspan at LCCC. Edwards found his interest in journalism in high school when he joined the yearbook and TV media classes at South High. He currently uses his photography and video experience to produce visual media for Wingspan and as a video and photography specialist at the Cheyenne Aquatic Center. His aspirations are to go on to produce video and photo content for a large online magazine or do freelance commercial advertising. To contact Edwards, please email him at chrised98@gmail.com or follow his Twitter at @Chrised98.

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